sæl dyr øhavet

High-flying birds and other animals

Photo: Destination Fyn

On many of the islands, various wading birds breed on the coasts, and in many places you will find huge colonies such as tern and seagull colonies.

The South Fyn Archipelago is under international protection, and several areas on the islands are designated nature preserves with no access during the breeding season from 1 March to 15 July.

The Arctic tern is the bird that migrates the most. It breeds here in the summer, and late in the year it flies to Antarctica to stay through the winter.

You will find the oystercatcher, lapwing, ringed plover, common redshank and in some places, avocet, ruff, black-tailed godwit and dunlin.

The low coastal waters form resting places for thousands of birds, including various types of swans that stay out in the archipelago while they moult their flight feathers. During this time, they cannot fly and, consequently, are very sensitive to disturbances.

All along the coasts, you will find plenty of animal life in the low waters, e.g., beach crabs, bay scrimp and blue mussels. On the islands there are a number of toad species which are found on the Danish lists of endangered species, namely, the fire-bellied toad and the green toad, both of which are protected and may not be caught or disturbed. The green frogs are quite numerous on the islands of the South Fyn Archipelago. You will find huge populations of them by waterholes and in swamps.

The largest wild land animals of the South Fyn Archipelago, though not on the very small islands, are the fallow deer and roe deer. Otherwise, you will find predators like the fox, badger, beech marten, least weasel, European polecat, stoat and escaped mink.

In the waters near the coast, you will often be lucky enough to see a porpoise, frequently traveling in small schools, looking for food like cod, herring and other small fry along the coast. 

Another large mammal of the sea is the harbour seal, which hangs out at sand points, banks, islands and islets, resting between feeding.